Great Lakes Skipper Blog

  • Boating in Bad Weather

    Summer! It's finally time for long, sunny days, warm weather - and storms, which can cause more damage than just wet clothes and dampened spirits. Strong winds can whip up waves to dangerous heights, and lightning can be lethal.

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  • Coping With Seasickness

    For some unfortunate souls, boating can be a stomach-churning experience. Experienced sailors can get a little green around the gills, too, when the weather turns rough. Seasickness happens to a lot of people, but there are ways to alleviate that dizziness and nausea so you don't wind up "feeding the fish" by throwing up over the side of the boat.

    As far as we know, motion sickness is caused by conflicting sensory information. When the information picked up by your eyes doesn't match that picked up by the balance centers in your inner ears, it can make you feel dizzy and sick. This is why some people only get carsick while reading a book or riding in the backseat: the body senses that it's in motion, but according to the eyes, everything is standing still.

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  • Help With Hatches

    Shop the Skipper's hatch sale! Get 10% off hatches, doors, and portlights through April 30. 

    You're ready for boat season! Your fiberglass is shiny, your decals are brilliant, your chrome is so bright that it shines like the sun itself. How about those hatches? Is the Plexiglas® hatch lens cracked or clouded? Are the frames discolored? Maybe it's time to swap them out for something new.

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  • Super Seats

    Get 'em while they're hot! All boat seats are 10% off through April 14, 2019!

    New boat upholstery is so beautiful: flawless and firm. As much as we wish it, it doesn't stay that way; the elements inevitably make their mark. When that time comes, you can look at it as a wonderful opportunity to create a custom seating configuration for your boat.

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  • Merci, Monsieur Pitot!

    In 1732, an engineer named Henri Pitot got the job of measuring the flow of the Seine, the famous river that bisects the city of Paris. A late bloomer, Pitot seems to have been an unremarkable student until age 19, when he fell in love with geometry after picking up a book on the subject in a shop. Pitot went on to accomplish many feats of engineering in his career, but it's the contraption he devised to measure the speed of water flow that has made his name famous among boaters.

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  • Trust, But Verify, Part 3: Speedometers

    When boaters talk speedos, they don't mean the cheeky swimwear (well, not usually). The speedometer enjoys pride of place on a boat's dashboard, and when it goes bad, it's pretty obvious. Finding and fixing the problem can take a little detective work, but it's not difficult.

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  • Trust, But Verify, Part 2: Basic Gauge Troubleshooting

    Nobody enjoys bad news, especially not from one of the boat's gauges. If you're getting a reading that doesn't seem right (or no reading at all), it's not difficult to figure out the problem.

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  • Trust, But Verify, Part 1: Fuel Gauges

    With certain parts exposed to the elements, your boat's gauges and their sensors can take a beating. If you suspect that your gauge is not giving you an accurate reading, we have some hints for how to figure out the problem and how to fix it.

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  • Blackbeard!

    The most famous pirate of all time, Blackbeard, died three hundred years ago this week. He inspired Robert Louis Stevenson's Long John Silver and J. M. Barrie's Captain Hook, and has been portrayed on film by actors like Ian McShane and Peter Ustinov. As well known as he is, there is much about him that remains mysterious.

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  • Batten Down the Hatches!

    Save 10% on boat deck and floor hatches, escape and ventilation hatches, portlights, and storage boxes through November 25, 2018!

    How many of us have caught wind of trouble and said, "Batten down the hatches"? We know we have. It's something we say and hear often, but have you ever thought of where the expression comes from?

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